Posts Tagged ‘Paul Derricott’

The improvising artist searching for his or her voice had led this listener down some intriguing paths.

Some are dead ends – the artist becoming so enraptured with the voice of their musical hero that they only imitate; brilliantly, yet still only imitation. Some are tangled thickets of intricately and beautifully carved and shaped vines – the trap of technique, all too common in jazz, a music that continues to mistake the meaning of virtuosity. Some paths fade out to weedy and stony ground, the path dissipated, all direction lost.

Sydney trumpeter Eamon Dilworth has always led this listener down a path that seems to become stronger and more defined with every release. His keen focus allows him to divert occassionally – as I write his most recent aside trip has been working with rockin’ Ed Kuepper in The Aints – yet, soon enough his sure foot is back on that good, sound path.

Dilworth viata1

A recent trip to Romania has helped Dilworth shine a light on the road ahead – he says: “The trip opened me up to consider who I am, where I come from and how I deal with experiences and challenges. My musical output changed from this day to seek a deeper connection through my music and performance…”

The result is his exquisite new album Viata. The title is taken from the Romanian word for Life, but a much more existential and accepting definition of life – life as simply being.

This more passive and spiritual idea colours the album’s performances. Each of the nine pieces are more “settings” than compositions, or even improvisations – settings for Dilworth to express this idea of vista/life, and his reaction to it.

And the voice he speaks with is undoubtedly his own. The band of Alistair Spence on piano, Carl Morgan on guitar, bassist Jon Zwartz and long time Dilworth collaborator, drummer Paul Derricott, work impeccably creating these ‘settings’, lending them drama and a theatricality that makes each piece a small universe of its own.Dilworth viata2

‘A Love Affair’ is a duet between trumpet and piano, Dilworth staying with the mid to lower registers of his instrument, and creating some lovely burnished tones in his playing. The band joins in for ‘Discomfort’, Morgan’s high pearly notes adding an open-sky ceiling to the sound. The trumpet here has a deep anguish to it, reminiscent of Miles Davis‘ ‘weeping’ tone on ‘Solea’ From Sketches

‘Eick’ has Dilworth declining long tones over a childrens’ song piano. Morgan here reminds of John Abercrombie in his anti-guitar playing. Many of the tunes on Viata have a European dissonance, a Bartokian slipping in and out of key and tone – not exactly dissonance, more the stretching of the envelope, a very human thing, tying it to the universality of the blues.

Dilworth’s use of long tones used here seem to come from the same place as Jon Hassell – a virtuosity of restraint and atmosphere. ‘Prelude Dreamtime’ is a floating world of dreamy, languid brass tones; the lady of ‘The Lady’ moves in and out of shadows indigo and blue-green.

Album closer ‘Toran’ exemplifies the European human-ness that is across Viata. The extended trumpet tones across a repeated minimal rhythm – occasionally interrupted by an angular rhythmic figure – have a strong folk feeling; and you realise that so much of Viata has a sense of folk form about it.

This folk favour is one element that is part of the depth of what Eamon Dilworth has done here – in reaching into himself and finding ways to express what he finds there in music, he has found a voice at once entirely individual and yet, universal. The path leads on…

 

Viata is available at https://eamondilworth.bandcamp.com

Eamon Dilworth’s website is http://www.eamondilworth.com

 

I initially thought local label, Art As Catharsis was named so as yet another piece of post-post-modern irony. But having listened to many of their releases, I know now it is not – the music is entirely cathartically moving, innovative and beautiful.

No exception is the label’s recent release of Paul Derricott‘s Coast. Named for the band Derricott has put together for this project, ‘Coast’ refers to the meeting of shore and sea – as he puts it: “(the) Sydney coastline, the thin line between bobbing up and down our heads above the water and the unrelenting energy of the ocean that surrounds…”.

Derricott Coast2And the ocean metaphor is all over this music. Derricott has always been one of our most surprising drummers, technically exciting while at ease in any improvisational situation, creating effortlessly and colourfully. The Coast ensemble could not have been better chosen to bring his vision to life – Shannon Stitt on keys, guitarist Peter Koopman and Michael Avgenicos on sax.

No having a dedicated bass player – Stitt contributes bass on the keys –  lends the music an original flow. It pushes the arrangements into places where new funk can flower, or the push-pull of rhythm section becomes more tense. Of course, Stitt’s facility could have him easily emulating a bass player, but that would entirely miss the point, and confuse the trajectory of this music.

Opener ‘Blackline’ sets up a template of heavy syncopation, bringing to mind 70s proggers Van Der Graaf Generator and recent Scandinavians Elephant 9, before smoothing out for a flowing Koopman solo – his playing, like that of John Scofield, always has a tang of the blues no matter where he takes it. Derricott Coast1

‘Tide’ contrasts with a liquid ambience – the benign calm of the sea after ‘Blackline”s squall storm – it’s melody ebbing and flowing back and forth.

‘Or Not’ leaps out of the box with a funky waaaah!, jumping between time signatures before devolving into heavy sludge – a dazzling play of contrasts that keeps your ears pricked up. Michael Avgenicos and Derricott play a drums/horn conversation that really cooks, adding some tropic heat to the beach.

Conga player George Rojas is added for instant Latin on ‘Dance 35’ which winds its way to a 7/8 montuno that frames Derricott’s drum solo – his solo here is a highlight of the many highlights across Coast.

Paul Derricott has surprised us consistently with his projects and collaborations such as Arrow, Derroderro, The Dilworths and Tiny Hearts as well as performances with… pretty much the Australian improvised music phone book. The smartly considered compositions and arrangements on Coast, together with this unusual line-up of hand-picked players make this album yet another beautifully realised project in his catalogue.

Paul Derricott’s website is https://paulderricott.com

 

In James Ryan’s liner notes to Aaron Michael’s eponymous debut, Aaron Michael, he mentions that the Sydney saxophonist took an unusual tack when picking the players for these sessions. He put together people who did not usually play together, players from different parts of the jazz community – a risky move, but one which paid off, as the band appears to greatly relish the new accents and flavours of the experiment. You can hear their buzz jumping from the tracks.

pic aaron blakey

pic aaron blakey

In the goldfish bowl of the Australian jazz scene this might be the sort of calculated risk that we need to see more of. All evolution needs diversity and the occasional short sharp shock to the status quo.

Opener ‘Leytonstone’ is an immediate illustration of the ensemble’s joy: a bright expression of positivity – a happy strut with maybe a whiff of New Orleans gumbo, the tune’s broad smile disguises an intricate melody – intricate in harmony as well as phrasing. Michael digs in for a solo duet with drummer Paul Derricott that cuts up hot and sweet.

And here it must be mentioned that Aaron Michael’s playing has not had the edge knocked off, despite being the go-to horn-guy who seems to be playing all the time, with everyone… everywhere… Consummate professionalism can be a hell of a thing – too many players lose their own identity, their own voice, working nine-to-five replicating the voices of others, as superbly as that may be. But the most beautiful thing, ultimately, is a musician’s own voice, as it has all the scars and laugh-lines and happy-sads of life which make it as unique as fingerprints or a face. Session work can suck that right out of a player.

Aaron Michael’s voice is as true to himself as he would want – a clean, nimble, modern tenor tone, unadorned with effects or false sentiment, it is astringently honest. Check ‘Por Favor’, a lanquid pulseless ballad that Michael’s soprano floats over – bringing to mind Wayne Shorter’s ability to express every part of the straight sax’s vocabulary, sometimes within the same phrase: the sharp jabs widening out to round, sonorous tones. (The lovely bonus track at the end of the CD is for once, truly a bonus – a second take of ‘Por Favor’ with a spare piano accompaniment – lovely stuff indeed).

‘Here and Now’ shows Aaron Michael’s compositional strengths – it is a piece of contrasts: 3/4 against 4/4, swing pulse against straight, with a smartly conceived ensemble section towards the latter part of the tune (and, as a bon-bon, a typically measured and balanced piano solo from Matt McMahon). Michael’s ‘Spicy Beans’ with its rush-hour head and his 9/8 gospel blues ‘Communion’ (with a testifying bass solo from Duncan Brown) are sharp pieces of writing that also show him as a jazz composer to watch.aaron michael Album cover

‘Spicy Beans’ and Paul Derricott’s ‘Evening Haze’ have the band plugging into some fusion electricity. Guitarist Dieter Kleeman snaps, crackles and shreds on these – an impressive player equally at home playing a sweet acoustic jazz tone on the opener ‘Leytonstone’. The whole band, in fact, strongly convinces on the rock pieces while remaining totally mesmerising on the more ‘jazz’ tunes.

But as hot as the players are, and as fine as Aaron Michael’s compositions may be, it is really his playing which makes Aaron Michael such a startling debut. As a pointer, the sheer beauty and downright ‘heart’ of his solo on the last piece ‘Communion’ is a small masterclass in blues, restraint, humanity in music and transcendence of technique. Modern jazz has always been a balancing act between science and poetry, chops and soul – and sadly, too many players fall for the formulae and lose the funk.

Gladly, Aaron Michael is not one of them and you need go no further than Aaron Michael for actual proof.

Aaron Michael is available from http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/aaronmichael2

Aaron Michael’s website is http://aaronmichaelband.com/

Published June 2103 on australianjazz.net